In the United States, a team of scientists has developed a new method to cure chronic wounds in patients with diabetes, using larvae from Lucilia sericata - common greenfly - that secrete substances that have the ability to clean the wound, fluidize the dead tissue, and promote the development of granulated tissue, a type of connective tissue that is formed during the healing of wounds.

To get these wounds healed, doctors usually remove the infected or dead tissue with a scalpel or enzymes, but this often does not give the expected result and patients are at risk of losing their limbs. However, as explained by Lawrence Eron of Kaiser Hospital and the University of Hawaii in Honolulu, and one of the leading researchers, the therapy with worms It is very effective because after a single treatment the wounds look better.

The study involved 37 diabetic patients with a type of arterial disease which hinders blood circulation in the extremities, and which also had rebellious wounds, in some cases up to five years old.

The researchers placed between 50 and 100 larvae of the flyLucilia sericata -Which had previously been encased in a device similar to a mesh and sealed to prevent them from coming out- on the wounds of these patients, and let them act for two days, at which time they placed new worms, repeating this process an average of five times.

In twenty-one of the patients the infection was eradicated, the dead tissue was completely eliminated, strong connective tissue was formed in the wound, and the lesion was closed in more than three quarters.

Good results were obtained with twenty-one of the patients, in which the infection was eradicated, the dead tissue was completely eliminated, strong connective tissue was formed in the wound, and the lesion was closed in more than three quarters.

In fact, five wounds that were infected with the 'superbug' MRSA were successfully cured by treatment with larvae. Of the nine wounds infected with another bacterium called SASM, six were cured. And the 10 cases that had infection by group B streptococcus They were also treated effectively.

The therapy, however, did not work for some patients; among them, one had excessive inflammation around the wound, two were bleeding too much, and three had problems with infected bones.

Eron has stated that the treatment with larvae is the first step of the healing process, and that subsequently the wound must be treated with hydrogels, grafts of cultivated cell tissue, or clothing under negative pressure. But before such treatments can be used effectively, the wound must be cleaned, the dead tissue removed, and grainy tissue formed in the wound, and this process is contributed by the worms.

Source: EUROPE PRESS

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