Preeclampsia is a complication of pregnancy that consists of the fact that the pregnant woman suffers from two conditions at the same time: hypertension and proteinuria (proteins in the urine), which are signs that indicate that the woman's arterial system presents some problem and that, if not controlled and treated, can trigger dangerous conditions for the health of the future mother and the developing fetus.

A group of scientists from the Renal Disease Research Network (REDinREN), the Higher Council for Scientific Research (CSIC) and the Rare Diseases Network Biomedical Research Center (CIBERER) has identified a protein -the endoglin- that fulfills a key role in the occurrence of preeclampsia during pregnancy.

Preeclampsia, which is estimated to affect 5% of pregnant women in developed countries, causes health problems for both mother and baby

Researchers have found that this protein is involved in alterations in circulatory and renal function that occur in pregnant women as a result of preeclampsia, and also observed in the various studies that the release of soluble endoglin was related to levels of elevated oxidized cholesterol.

The finding of these researchers is very important because it can contribute to develop new ways of approaching preeclampsia, a condition for which there is currently no effective treatment, so when it is serious it is necessary to advance the delivery or perform a cesarean section.

Preeclampsia, which is estimated to affect 5% of pregnant women in developed countries, causes problems for both the mother and the fetus, as it damages the kidneys, liver and endothelium of the pregnant woman, which can even cause death, and can also cause delayed intrauterine growth and the birth of a premature baby.

Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy (November 2019).