Researchers of the University of London (United Kingdom) have tested the effectiveness of a new 'home' test to detect human papilloma virus (HPV), responsible for the development of cervical cancer or cervical cancer. The great advantage of this test is to provide an early diagnosis to those women who do not have easy access to cytology, the reference test to detect this pathology. However, scientists have recognized that the test has certain drawbacks, such as its tendency to find problems in women who are actually healthy, what is known as giving 'false positives', and that can unnecessarily alarm the population and increase the health charge.

The great advantage of this test is to provide an early diagnosis to women who do not have easy access to cytology, the reference test to detect this pathology.

The DIY test It proved to be effective and well accepted by patients in a trial that was carried out in Mexico and that included around 20,000 women. The researchers observed that DIY discovered the existence of both cervical cancer and cervical intraepithelial neoplasms, which are precancerous conditions that can be treated to prevent the development of cancer.

Attila Lorincz, professor of Molecular Epidemiology of the University of London, and one of the scientists who participated in the study, whose results have published 'Lancet', highlights the sensitivity of the test to identify those women who have a higher risk of cancer, and how important it is to detect early the disease in women who have difficulties to perform a cytology and can not be vaccinated against HPV.

Cervical cancer, unlike other types of cancer and other diseases, can be prevented and treated successfully if it is detected in time and, for years, programs of 'screening' cervical cancer in developed countries, and vaccination programs are also being implemented to immunize girls against HPV. Studies have shown that cervical cancer is more frequent and causes a greater number of deaths in those countries where women do not have access to screening programs; hence the advantage of a test like the DIY test, which can be done without leaving the house.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), half a million new cases of cervical cancer are detected annually, which ranks as the second most frequent cancer in the female population worldwide, resulting in the death of 250,000 women each year. .

Cervical Cancer Staging (November 2019).