Despite the fact that epilepsy is the second most frequent neurological pathology, with around 400,000 patients diagnosed in Spain, the World Health Organization (WHO) warns that the scarcity of resources and the social stigma that accompanies it cause that between a 60 and 90 percent of epileptic people residing in developed countries are not adequately treated.

Epilepsy is a very complex disease that affects people of all ages, and includes more than 30 different types of epileptic seizures, characterized by various symptoms such as convulsions, spasms and abrupt contractions of muscles, and loss of consciousness, between others, and around 100 epileptic syndromes.

The Treaty of Epilepsy addresses all aspects associated with pathology, from its history and diagnostic elements, to the various options available for its treatment, and its prognosis and consequences

With the aim of analyzing epilepsy and epileptic syndromes, in addition to deepening knowledge about the diagnosis and treatment of this disease, 70 Spanish epileptologists have joined their experience to develop a new Treaty of Epilepsy, aimed at specialists in Neurology and any other health professional interested in the subject, which has been edited by the Spanish Society of Neurology (SEN) and the Spanish Society of Pediatric Neurology (SENP), in collaboration with UCB Pharma.

During the presentation of the Treaty, in the LXIII Congress of the SEN, Dr. Jerónimo Sancho, president of this Society, has highlighted that there have been important advances in neuroimaging techniques and other exploratory methods, and that new ones have also been developed. drugs and improvements in surgical interventions in recent years.

Throughout 47 chapters, divided into three sections, the new publication addresses all aspects associated with this pathology, from its history and diagnostic elements, to the various options currently available for its treatment, and the prognosis and consequences of the disease on the quality of life of the patient.

The specialists who have participated in this initiative have wanted to record the social problems that this disease brings because of the stigmatization still suffered by patients today and that it is necessary to fight. Thus, in the last chapter, the authors describe the social and labor problems that affect patients that are translated, for example, into social rejection or difficulties in finding or maintaining a job.

Children also suffer from epilepsy

Epilepsy has a high incidence in the child population and, for this reason, several chapters of the Treaty of Epilepsy also deal with the diagnosis and treatment of this pathology in childhood. It is estimated that, in our country, the incidence of epilepsy in children under 15 years of age is 62.6 cases diagnosed per 100,000 people.

The development of the brain that occurs during childhood is a factor involved in the appearance of epilepsy in this stage of life. Dr. Carlos Salas, one of the coordinators of the Treaty, believes that in the pediatric age it is more complicated to establish the diagnosis, and that the treatment requires great precision and the doses must be carefully adjusted to prevent possible risks or the appearance of sequelae in the central nervous system, which in children is in the process of development.

Sources: Spanish Society of Neurology (SEN) and the Spanish Society of Pediatric Neurology (SENP)

Psychogenic Seizures — What are They, How Can They be Diagnosed and Treated? (November 2019).