Mild memory failures, which are often associated with aging, such as forgetting where we left the keys or where we parked the car, could be early signs of the future appearance of Alzheimer's, in the opinion of a group of specialists who have attended the Conference of the International Alzheimer's Association in Boston, United States.

This type of forgetfulness they have been associated for years with the natural aging process of the human being. However, by studying the relationship of memory failure patterns with markers or genetic alterations in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid, the evidence grows that it could be predicted when a person shows the first symptoms of Alzheimer's.

"By studying the relationship of memory failure patterns with markers or genetic alterations in the brain, there is growing evidence that the first symptoms of Alzheimer's could be predicted."

One difficulty that scientists find when evaluating these slight memory losses and their importance is that some conditions, such as insomnia, stress or depressive disorders, or taking certain medications, can influence a person have those failures temporarily.

To analyze it, Rebecca Amariglio, a neurologist at Brgham and Women's Hospital in Boston, asked 189 healthy people over 65 about their memories and performed brain scans to detect the presence of the beta amyloid protein (which is believed to be an early sign of Alzheimer's). The experts observed that those people who had greater difficulty remembering had an accumulation of this protein in their brain.

Another research carried out by Cecilia Samieri, of the Research Center of INSERM of Bordeaux, in France, proved that there is a strong association between this type of memory failures and a genetic defect called APOE-4, which increases the risk of suffering Alzheimer.

Neuroimaging and Biomarkers: How Early Can We Diagnose Alzheimer's? (November 2019).