The human papilloma virus (HPV), which is transmitted through sexual intercourse, is responsible for genital infections such as condylomata (a type of wart), and an important risk factor for developing cervical cancer. Now, an investigation that has been carried out in the University of Ohio, in the United States, has revealed that this virus, in addition, is behind the appearance of a type of oral carcinoma that has a significantly high prevalence among men.

The study involved more than 5,000 people between 14 and 69 years old, who answered a series of questions about their habits and carried out a test to detect the possible presence of the virus in the oral cavity. The researchers found that the incidence of oral infection caused by the papillomavirus was 10.1 percent in men, while in the case of women it was reduced to 3.6 percent. They observed that strain 16 of HPV, which is one of the most aggressive and is associated with the development of cancer of the cervix, penis, anus and vulva, was the one that appeared most frequently among those affected.

The incidence of oral infection caused by the papillomavirus was 10.1 percent in men, while in the case of women it was reduced to 3.6 percent

The job data, which has been published in Journal of the American Medical Association, show that sexual behavior is directly related to the risk of infection, since people who had had a greater number of sexual partners were more likely to be infected with the virus, which also increased with the use of tobacco that, together with Alcohol intake has always been considered an important risk factor for developing oral cancer.

Based on the results of the study, the authors conclude that new research is necessary to implement strategies for the prevention and early detection of this type of infection that, also in Europe, is increasing its incidence. The experts recommend to the population to take extreme precautions to prevent sexually transmitted diseases, and go to the doctor when there is a lesion in the oral cavity that is not cured, or an aphonia that lasts for no reason.

Oral cancer and HPV (November 2019).