A study carried out in the United Kingdom by researchers from the 'Imperial College of London' has shown that the consumption of mushrooms with hallucinogenic properties decreases the activity in the central areas of the brain. The scientists injected psilocybin - a substance that constitutes the active principle of several hallucinogenic mushrooms - to several volunteers who participated in the research, while others were administered placebo to detect the differences.

The researchers observed that when the organism assimilated drug there was a reduction in blood flow in his brain-especially in areas such as the thalamus and the zincunvolution of the anterior and posterior cingulate. As a result of the decrease in oxygenation in that part of the brain, the affected person's consciousness and personal identity are altered, as is their concept of space-time.

As a result of the decrease in oxygenation in the brain, the affected person's consciousness and personal identity are altered, as is their space-time concept.

The authors of the study explain that the sensations that the subject perceives when eating hallucinogenic mushrooms - and that cause a feeling of unreality with respect to the world that surrounds him -, depend to a great extent on the dose that has consumed, as well as on its characteristics individuals, and compare the effects of this drug with those produced by LSD.

In recent years, the use of psychoactive substances from plants and fungi has spread, especially among the youngest, although they can lead to death. Therefore, researchers believe that it is necessary to deepen the study of the effects of hallucinogens in humans, to determine what are the neuronal mechanisms involved in the psychedelic effects of these substances.

Your Brain on LSD and Acid (November 2019).