A higher consumption of foods rich in fiber reduces the risk of dying in the nine years after overcoming a myocardial infarction, as revealed by a new study that has been published in British Medical Journal. Thus, and according to the results of this work, people who after suffering an event of this type ingest more fiber, between 27 and 36 grams daily, had a 25% less chance of dying from any cause in that period of time .

The researchers decided to check what other factors associated with lifestyle, in addition to medical treatment, could influence the survival of patients who had gone through this serious coronary event, and analyzed data from two large studies conducted in the United States on health of thousands of health professionals -121,000 women and around 51,000 men-, of whom 2,258 women and 1,840 men had a heart attack in the course of 30 years.

A diet rich in fiber improves the glycemic response and insulin sensitivity and blood lipid levels, and is inversely associated with the risk of cardiovascular disease

The authors of the study divided these people into several groups based on the amount of fiber they consumed, and after a follow-up of nine years, they observed that if they only considered cardiovascular disorders as a cause of death, those that consumed more fiber (among 27 and 36 grams per day) had a 13% lower risk of dying than those who took less (between 12 and 17 grams per day).

The scientists adjusted the results taking into account other factors that could also influence the chances of survival after a heart attack, such as medical history, age, dietary habits, exercise, and so on. The data showed that each increase of ten grams of fiber per day was associated with 15% less chance of dying in the following nine years.

These experts have explained that a diet rich in fiber increases the feeling of satiety by helping to reduce caloric intake, improves glycemic response and insulin sensitivity and blood lipid levels, and is inversely associated with the risk of hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, obesity, and cardiovascular diseases.

Heart attack survivors who eat lots of fibre live longer (November 2019).