Some studies have associated an elevated calcium intake with a lower risk of suffering disorders such as type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity, which are considered risk factors for developing cardiovascular diseases. However, a study conducted in Switzerland by researchers at the University of Zurich has found that coronary risk does not decrease in people who take more than 1,100 milligrams a day of calcium and, in the case of those who take calcium supplements the chances of having a myocardial infarction could be up to 86% higher compared to those who never took this type of supplements.

The calcium did seem to exert a protective effect, reducing by 31% the chances of suffering heart failure, when the intake was moderate and hovered around 820 milligrams daily

The study evaluated the one-year diet of nearly 24,000 people who participated in the European Prospective Investigation on Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), which was conducted between 1994 and 1998 in Heidelberg. In a subsequent follow-up, which lasted about 11 years, there were 354 strokes, 260 cerebrovascular accidents, and 267 deaths associated with these episodes.

The scientists observed that calcium did seem to exert a protective effect, reducing by 31% the chances of suffering cardiac failure, when the intake was moderate and hovered around 820 milligrams daily. Therefore, they recommend that calcium supplements -which have also been related to the appearance of kidney stones-, be taken with caution, and explain that while calcium naturally occurs in food, it is assimilated little by little during all During the day, supplements can cause the level of calcium in the blood to rise above normal, which could be harmful in the long term.

Some people take these supplements in order to prevent bills, especially those of advanced age, postmenopausal women or those who have suffered kidney failure. The truth is that, although these studies are not definitive, it is advisable to take calcium naturally through the diet - no danger has been proven in this regard - or, if you opt for calcium supplements, that is a doctor who values ​​the risk / benefit ratio of their intake.

Vitamins, Supplements and Heart Disease (November 2019).