A new cancer vaccine, known as TG4010, combined with standard chemotherapy, has shown its ability to increase the effectiveness of such chemotherapy, in addition to slowing the progression of the most common type of lung cancer, the non-small cell (NSCLC). , which is mainly responsible for cases of death from cancer worldwide.

This type of lung cancer is characterized by the alteration of a protein, MUC1, which proliferates due to the presence of tumor cells. The function of the new vaccine is to stimulate the body's immune system to fight this protein and kill cancer cells.

At six months, the researchers observed that in 43% of the patients who had received the combined treatment (vaccine and chemotherapy), the disease had not progressed

In the study that has shown the effectiveness of the new drug, published in 'The Lancet Oncology', 148 patients have participated who suffered a CPCNP in advanced stages, coming from several European countries (Germany, France, Hungary and Poland). The patients were divided into two groups, and one of them was administered TG4014 together with chemotherapy (cisplatin and gemcitabine), and the other only chemotherapy. Six months later, the researchers observed that in 43% of the patients who had received the combined treatment (vaccine and chemotherapy), the disease had not progressed, which happened only in 35% of those who belonged to the group that only received chemotherapy.

Elisabeth Quoix and her team, from the University of Strasbourg (France), also detected that immunotherapy obtained better results in those patients who at the beginning of the study had a normal number of CD16 + CD56 + CD69 + lymphocytes, cells capable of hinder or reinforce the body's immune response, so that the level of these lymphocytes in the blood of those affected by a NSCLC, could help determine which patients are more likely to benefit from the administration of the vaccine. For this reason, the scientists emphasize that it is vital to perform an analysis of the biological status of patients to be able to predict the effectiveness of immunotherapy.

Source: EUROPE PRESS

TRACO 2013 - Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) & Prostate Cancer (November 2019).